Barcelona 1992; IPC: “Transforming Lives Makes Sense for Everyone” campaign

Part 1 – Infrastructure
 

 
In the second instalment of the the award-winning “Transforming Lives Makes Sense for Everyone” campaign, focuses on the accessible infrastructural legacies of the Barcelona 1992 Paralympic Games. The first of three short films, published to coincide with the UN International Day of Persons with Disabilities on 3 December, showcases how accessibility has made a real and long-lasting impact on peoples’ lives in Barcelona.

 

Part 2 – Transport
 

 
The second film of the IPC’s “Transforming Lives Makes Sense for Everyone” Barcelona 1992 campaign, focuses on some of the post-Games accessibility improvements made in transportation. The transport arrangements laid on for Para athletes during the Games provided a glimpse of how the integrated transport system of the future would look like.

 

Part 3 – Accessibility
 

 
Part three of the Transforming Lives Barcelona 1992 series made in conjunction with the UN Human Rights Office and SDG Action campaign. More information: Paralympic.org.

 

Videos by the International Paralympic Committee on YouTube.

Tokyo 2020; Posters Paralympic Games

Hirohiko Araki, Manga Artist, The Sky above The Great Wave off the Coast of Kanagawa (©Tokyo 2020)
Koji Kakinuma, Calligrapher, Open (©Tokyo 2020)
GOO CHOKI PAR, Graphic Designer, PARALYMPIAN (©Tokyo 2020)
Tomoyuki Shinki, Artist, Offense No.7 (©Tokyo 2020)
Asao Tokolo, Artist, HARMONIZED CHEQUERED EMBLEM STUDY
FOR TOKYO 2020 PARALYMPIC GAMES
[EVEN EDGED MATTERS COULD FORM
HARMONIZED CIRCLE WITH “RULE”] (©Tokyo 2020)
Mika Ninagawa, Photographer, Film Director, Higher than the Rainbow (©Tokyo 2020)
Chihiro Mori, Artist, Beyond the Curve(Five Thousand Rings) (©Tokyo 2020)
Akira Yamaguchi, Painter, Horseback Archery (©Tokyo 2020)
 

Tokyo 2020; Paralympic Torch Relay – Schedule

Part 1

The flame of passion will burn brightly in various locations across Japan
13th August 2020 ~ 17th August 2020

A Heritage Flame Celebration will be held in Stoke Mandeville in Great Britain – the spiritual birthplace of the Paralympic Movement – and flame-lighting festivals will take place at several locations across the host country, Japan, between 13 and 17 August. These flames will also visit schools, hospitals and facilities connected with the Paralympics in each prefecture of Japan.

Source: The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games

 

43 Prefectures

Prefectures Details
1 Hokkaido Flames will be lit and depart
2 Aomori Flames will be lit at 7 cities, combined in Aomori City and depart from Misawa City
3 Iwate Flames will be lit at 33 cities, combined and depart from Morioka City
4 Miyagi Flames will be lit at 9 cities, combined and depart from Sendai City
5 Akita Flames will be lit at 25 cities, combined and depart from Akita City
6 Yamagata Flames will be lit at 35 cities, combined and depart
7 Fukushima Flame will be lit and depart from Koriyama City
8 Ibaraki Flame will be lit and depart from Mito City
9 Tochigi Flames will be lit at 22 cities, then combined and depart
10 Gunma Flames will be lit at 6 cities, combined and depart from Isesaki City
11 Kanagawa Flames will be lit at 33 cities, combined and depart from Yokohama City
12 Niigata Flames will be lit at 30 cities, combined and depart from Niigata City
13 Toyama Flames will be lit at 15 cities, combined and depart from Toyama City
14 Ishikawa Flames will be lit at 7 cities, combined and depart from Kanazawa City
15 Fukui Flames will be lit at 17 cities, combined and depart from Fukui City
16 Yamanashi Flames will be lit at 5 cities, combined and depart from Kofu City
17 Nagano Flames will be lit at 13 cities, combined and depart from Nagano City
18 Gifu Flames will be lit at 25 cities, combined and depart from Gifu City
19 Aichi Flames will be lit at 49 cities, combined and depart from Nagoya City
20 Mie Flames will be lit at 29 cities, combined and depart from Tsu City
21 Shiga Flame will be lit and depart from Higashiomi City
22 Kyoto Flames will be lit at 16 cities, combined and depart from Kyoto City
23 Osaka Flames will be lit at several cities, then combined and depart
24 Hyogo Flames will be lit at 36 cities, combined and depart from Kobe City
25 Nara Flame will be lit and depart from Nara City
26 Wakayama Flame will be lit and depart from Tanabe City
27 Tottori Flames will be lit at 2 cities, combined and depart from Kurayoshi City
28 Shimane Flames will be lit at 11 cities, combined and depart from Matsue City
29 Okayama Flames will be lit at 27 cities, then combined and depart
30 Hiroshima Flames will be lit at 23 cities, combined and depart from Hiroshima City
31 Yamaguchi Flames will be lit at 19 cities, then combined and depart from Yamaguchi City
32 Tokushima Flames will be lit at 24 cities, combined and depart from Tokushima City
33 Kagawa Flames will be lit at 9 cities, combined and depart from Takamatsu City
34 Ehime Flames will be lit at 3 cities, combined and depart from Matsuyama City
35 Kochi Flames will be lit at several cities, then combined and depart
36 Fukuoka Flames will be lit at 33 cities, then combined and depart from Fukuoka City
37 Saga Flame will be lit and depart from Saga City
38 Nagasaki Flames will be lit at 5 cities, combined and depart from Nagasaki City
39 Kumamoto Flames will be lit at 24 cities, combined and depart from Kumamoto City
40 Oita Flames will be lit at 18 cities, combined and depart from Beppu City
41 Miyazaki Flame will be lit and depart from Miyazaki City
42 Kagoshima Flame will be lit and depart from Kagoshima City
43 Okinawa Flames will be lit at 16 cities, combined and depart from Naha City

 

Part 2

The brilliant light tours the co-host prefectures of the Paralympic Games
18th August 2020 ~ 21st August 2020

In addition to the flame-lighting festival and flame visits (optional), torch relays will be held in these three prefectures, each of which will host Paralympic events. Teams of three torchbearers will transport the flame, aiming to boost public interest and support ahead of the Paralympic Games.

Source: The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games

 

Dates

  • 18 August 2020: Shizuoka Prefecture
  • 19 August 2020: Chiba Prefecture
  • 20 August 2020: Saitama Prefecture
  • 21 August 2020: Tokyo Prefecture

 

Part 3

All the passion supporting the Paralympics comes together as one. The Paralympic Flame is Born!
22nd August 2020 ~ 25th August 2020

The flames from each flame lighting festival and the torch relays from all over Japan will be brought together in Tokyo on the 21st of August where the official Paralympic Flame will be lit. The final four days of the Paralympic Torch Relay will then commence in Tokyo.

Source: The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games

 

Dates

  • 22 August 2020: Chiyoda City →Taito City→Sumida City→Koto City→Edogawa City
  • 23 August 2020: Kunitachi City→Hino City→Tachikawa City→Higashiyamato City→Kokubunji City
  • 24 August 2020: Nishitokyo City→Mitaka City→Fuchu City→Chofu City→Setagaya City
  • 25 August 2020: Chuo City→Minato City→Shibuya City

 

Read more

Tokyo 2020; Paralympic Torch Manufacturing Process Video

In line with the concept ‘Share Your Light’, the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Torch will be created in Tokyo in August 2020 by the coming together of the collective passion of everyone who is supporting the Paralympics.

The torch for the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Torch Relay will symbolise the coming together of the sentiments of everyone involved with and supporting the Paralympic Games.

The shape of Japan – a cherry blossom motif
The torch for the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Torch Relay has been created in a traditional form using the aluminium extrusion manufacturing technology used in the production of the shinkansen bullet train.

Completely seamless – produced from a single sheet of metal.
A form that symbolises the Tokyo 2020 Torch Relay created by Japanese tradition and advanced technological capabilities.

 

Video: The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games on YouTube

Tokyo 2020; Paralympic Games Medals

Design

©The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.
©The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.
©The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

 

The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo 2020) unveiled the official design of the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic medals today, exactly one year before the Opening Ceremony of the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games. Designs for the medal ribbon and case were also unveiled.

The design is centred around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolise Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

Braille letters spell out “Tokyo 2020” on the medals’ face. A series of circular indentations on the side of the medals – one for gold, two for silver, three for bronze – make the medal types easy to distinguish by touch, the first time in Paralympic history that this provision has been made for athletes with a vision impairment.

As part of the Tokyo 2020 Medal Project, Tokyo 2020 Paralympic medals are being manufactured from recycled precious metals extracted from mobile phones and other small electronic devices donated by the public.

 

Specifications

Weight (without ribbon or pin)
-Gold: about 526g
-Silver: about 520g
-Bronze: about 430g

Thickness
-Thinnest point: 7.5 mm
-Thickest point: 10.7 mm

Diameter
-85 mm

Composition
-Gold: over 6 grams of gold plating on pure silver
-Silver: pure silver
-Bronze: red brass (95% copper, 5% zinc)

 

Medal designer

Sakiko Matsumoto
-Designer, Hakuhodo Products, Inc.

 

Video

 

Ribbon

©The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.
©The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

 

The medal ribbons, in the Games’ colours of crimson and cherry blossom, employ traditional Japanese design motifs of harmonised chequered emblems (kumiichi matsumon) in a design that expresses both the festive spirit of the Games and the principle of “Unity in Diversity”. Silicon convex dots – one for gold, two for silver, and three for bronze – are applied to the ribbon’s reverse side, enabling visually-impaired individuals to easily identify the medal type at a touch.

 

Medal case design

©The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

 

The indigo wooden cases are individually hand-crafted from Japanese ash by highly skilled artisans. The unique wood grain of each case represents the diversity of the Olympic and Paralympic Games. The circular case and lid are magnetised, allowing the medal to be displayed as if it is cradled within linked rings.

 

Source: The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games