Beijing 2022; Sustainability Plan (May 2020)

Beijing Organising Committee for the 2022 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (Beijing 2022) published the Beijing 2022 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Sustainability Plan (hereinafter referred to as Sustainability Plan) on 15 May. This plan was developed jointly by the People’s Government of Beijing Municipality, the People’s Government of Hebei Province, and the Beijing 2022. The plan serves as a programmatic document guiding the sustainability work of the Beijing 2022 Games and is being implemented throughout the entire process of the Games.

The sustainability plan reflects the Beijing 2022 mission of being “green, inclusive, open and clean”, and the reforms introduced through Olympic Agenda 2020——the strategic roadmap for the future of the Olympic Movement. It is also aligned with the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

 

The ‘Beijing 2022 Sustainability Plan’ can be downloaded from the Beijing 2022 website.

IOC; Headlines IOC EB Meeting May 2020

IOC Executive Board Meeting
14 May
Remote meeting

IOC approves a financial envelope of up to USD 800 million to address the COVID-19 crisis
The International Olympic Committee (IOC) anticipates that it will have to bear costs of up to USD 800 million for its part of the responsibilities for the organisation of the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020, its own extended operations and the support for the wider Olympic Movement. This amount will be covered by the IOC itself, including any funding from the Olympic Foundation.

Read more: Press release

 

Team spirit evident in delivery of Tokyo 2020 in 2021
The International Olympic Committee (IOC) Executive Board (EB) received a report today on the progress being made by the IOC’s “Here We Go” Task Force to reorganise the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020. In particular, the report highlighted the team spirit and unity being shown by all of the stakeholders involved in the organisation of the Games to make them a success.

Read more: Press release

 

Impact of the postponement of Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 on the schedule of IOC Athletes’ Commission election
The Executive Board (EB) of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) today decided to launch a review of the schedule of the IOC Athletes’ Commission (AC) election in light of the postponement of the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020, with a view to holding the election in 2021 during the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020. Measures will also be considered in order to ensure the work of the IOC Athletes’ Commission can continue smoothly until the Games.

Read more: Press release

 

IOC Executive Board agrees to virtual IOC Session in July
The 136th International Olympic Committee (IOC) Session will be held virtually on 17 July and live-streamed for all of those who want to follow.

Read more: Press release

Book recommendation; Images of the Past: Wembley: The History of the Iconic Twin Towers

From the publisher:

Images of the Past: Wembley: The History of the Iconic Twin Towers
Maurice Crow

It was the field of dreams, the birthplace of legends, the hallowed home of our sporting gods. Historic Wembley Stadium, with its iconic Twin Towers, was truly the most revered of venues.

Until the Millennium, when the world-renowned colossus was demolished to make way for its futuristic replacement, the famous old Stadium witnessed some of the most heroic events of the Twentieth Century. But its history, although always exciting, was also often uncertain– and not a little bizarre.

So, despite most eyes being on future fixtures as the sporting hub heads towards it centenary, it is the ancient edifice’s often forgotten past that is the subject of this book. And the uncomfortable truth is that Wembley’s original debut was anything but auspicious. In fact, it was once viewed as a debt-ridden disaster. So doomed was it deemed to be that the North London complex was about to be knocked down – and was rescued only at the last moment, in the most extraordinary circumstances. Happily, it recovered to become a success story, the memories of which are recorded here, hopefully to open the floodgates of nostalgia for followers of sport.

Wembley, it must be remembered, came to the rescue of the first post-War Olympics when no other nation on earth would accept the challenge. It gripped greyhound racing aficionados and it thrilled to the roar of speedway stars. The giants of American football also muscled in to display their skills there.

Great Britons like Frank Bruno and Henry Cooper stepped into the ring (and Cassius Clay was felled to the canvas) before stunned boxing fans. And, of course, Wembley crowds gasped in awe at the footwork of Stanley Matthews and wept in ecstasy at the triumph of Bobby Moore.

But the North London location is more than just the Holy Grail of sport. It has seen defining moments in pop music history, such as Live Aid. It has given platforms to the Pope and evangelist Billy Graham. It has staged breathtaking spectaculars no other venue could hope to accommodate, growing in stature over the course of an astonishing century.

This then, for both sports buffs and social historians, is historic Wembley’s story … an unfolding saga played out beneath those symbolically soaring Twin Towers.

 

By Maurice Crow
Imprint: Pen & Sword History
Series: Images of the Past
Pages: 133
Illustrations: 150
ISBN: 9781526702074
Published: 5th March 2018

 

Source

Tokyo 2020; Sustainability Pre-Games Report

The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo 2020) today published its Sustainability Pre-Games Report, showing details of how it plans to deliver a sustainable Tokyo 2020 Games and highlighting progress on some of the initiatives undertaken throughout 2019. The Report was prepared in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Standards: Core option, a set of international standards governing sustainability reporting.

 

The ‘Tokyo 2020 Sustainability Pre-Games Report’ can be downloaded from the Tokyo 2020 website.

Tokyo 2020; Press release: IOC and Tokyo 2020 Joint Statement – Framework for Preparation of the Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 Following their Postponement to 2021

Press release by International Olympic Committee and the Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games:

 

IOC and Tokyo 2020 Joint Statement – Framework for Preparation of the Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 Following their Postponement to 2021

 

The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo 2020) and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) met today for an Executive Project Review via teleconference.

IOC Coordination Commission Chair John Coates and Olympic Games Executive Director Christophe Dubi joined Tokyo 2020 President MORI Yoshiro and CEO MUTO Toshiro for the meeting. During the productive discussion, Tokyo 2020 and the IOC agreed on the following framework, that will govern preparations for the postponed Games:

 

Governance

The process to deliver the Games in 2021 is overseen by a Joint Steering Committee which is led by IOC Coordination Commission Chair John Coates and Tokyo 2020 President MORI Yoshiro. The Committee will include Tokyo 2020 CEO MUTO Toshiro and IOC Olympic Games Executive Director Christophe Dubi.

The meetings of the Joint Steering Committee will be held whenever necessary, in order to ensure permanent coordination and efficient decision-making.

Supporting this Joint Steering Committee, Tokyo 2020 and the IOC will each have their own respective task forces: the “Here we go” Task Force on the IOC side, and the “New Launch” Task Force on the Tokyo 2020 side.

 

Principles

The key elements of the planning for 2021 should replicate the existing Games Delivery Plan for 2020. Particular focus will be placed on the venues and the competition schedule, which were originally agreed by all stakeholders as the best plan for the 2020 edition. On this basis, the Japanese side including Tokyo 2020 will request that each planned venue owner organises the Games according to this schedule on the new dates in 2021. The Japanese side will also seek understanding for these preparations.

On the basis of Olympic Agenda 2020, the IOC, the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and all Olympic and Paralympic Movement stakeholders, in conjunction with Japanese side including the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee, will explore all opportunities to optimise and streamline the scope and service levels at the Games, and reduce the costs that have been caused by the postponement. The IOC and the Japanese side, including the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee, will continue to assess and discuss jointly about the respective impacts caused by the postponement.

A number of measures addressing the potential impact of COVID-19 will be incorporated into the Games Delivery Plan for the Games in 2021.

 

Timeline

The details of planning for Tokyo 2020 in 2021 are being examined this month with a view to establishing a new roadmap for the Games by May 2020, in order to then align resources and priorities accordingly.

 

Speaking after the meeting, IOC Coordination Commission Chair John Coates said, “Since the postponement of Tokyo 2020 to 2021 was agreed a few weeks ago, the strong spirit of collaboration between the IOC, the IPC, the Olympic Movement, Tokyo 2020 and the Japanese authorities has already allowed us to bring some clarity and certainty to athletes, fans and stakeholders around the world. The principles outlined today will allow us to continue in this spirit, and to answer the many questions that remain, in as efficient a manner as possible.

We believe that the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 can stand as a beacon of hope to the world during these troubled times, and that the Olympic flame can be the light at the end of the tunnel in which the world finds itself at present. The Joint Steering Committee will give its all to ensure that this is the case.”

Tokyo 2020 President MORI Yoshiro commented, “Soon after the postponement of the Tokyo 2020 Games on 24 March 2020, Tokyo 2020 established a ‘New Launch’ Task Force on 26 March and we have been working since then to create a structure capable of overcoming these unprecedented challenges. We believe that today’s new step is an important achievement in advancing over the coming year what we have prepared over the past five to six years. We will continue to work closely with all stakeholders to ensure the success of the Games.”