2026 Bid; Candidature process and potential bids (June 2017)

On 9 June 2017, the IOC Executive Board discussed the 2026 candidature process;

The Executive Board also agreed on the principles that should guide the further evolution of the candidature process. Speaking at a press conference, IOC President Thomas Bach emphasised that, whereas the decision about awarding the Olympic Games 2024 is about a seizing a unique opportunity, the evolution of the candidature process for the Olympic Games 2026 is about addressing the specific challenge that the candidature process has become too expensive and too onerous, and produces too many losers. For the 2026 candidature process, the IOC will take a more proactive role in assisting and supporting cities considering a candidature. The IOC will customize its approach to the needs of the cities in order for them to develop the best value proposition. These measures will lead to a simplified process for the cities, with reduced costs. The new approach will be discussed at the IOC Session in July.

Source

 

The following cities are considering to submit a bid for the 2026 Winter Olympic Games;

Innsbruck (Austria)  
Source: Proposed Innsbruck 2026 Olympic Winter Games Bid Wins National Support [GamesBids]

Calgary (Canada)
Official website

Sapporo (Japan)
Source: Sapporo mayor interested in hosting 2026 Winter Olympics [The Japan Times]

Sion (Switzerland)
Official website

Erzurum (Turkey)
Source: Erzurum emerges as contender for 2026 Winter Olympics [Inside The Games]

The candidature process is expected to start later this year. The host city will be selected in 2019.

 

Previous host countries Winter Olympic Games

2026 Bid; Potential bids (March 2017)

The following cities are considering to submit a bid for the 2026 Winter Olympic Games;

Innsbruck (Austria)  
Source: Decision On Innsbruck 2026 Olympic Winter Games Bid Expected By September [GamesBids]

Calgary (Canada)
Official website

Helsinki (Finland) as co-host
Source: Sipilä supportive of Finland submitting bid to co-host Winter Olympics [Helsinki Times]

Lillehammer (Norway)
Source: Discussions to take place on potential Lillehammer bid for 2026 Olympics, Norwegian official claims [Inside the Games]

Sapporo (Japan)
Source: Sapporo mayor interested in hosting 2026 Winter Olympics [The Japan Times]

Sion (Switzerland)
Official website

Stockholm (Sweden)
Official website

The candidature process is expected to start later this year. The host city will be selected in 2019.

 

Previous host countries Winter Olympic Games

 

 

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Update March 16, 2017

Erzurum (Turkey)
Source: Erzurum emerges as contender for 2026 Winter Olympics [Inside The Games]

2022 Bid; IOC statement on 2022 Bidding Process

lviv6

Following positive discussions between the President of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), Thomas Bach, the Ukrainian Prime Minister, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, and the President of the National Olympic Committee (NOC) of Ukraine, Sergey Bubka, all parties have agreed that Lviv will turn its attention to an Olympic bid for 2026, and not continue with its application for 2022.
The decision comes as a result of the present political and economic circumstances in Ukraine, which were discussed between the three parties.

“The preliminary evaluation by the IOC’s working group found that the Lviv bid offered huge potential for future development,” said IOC President Thomas Bach. “In my discussions with the Ukrainian Prime Minster and NOC President, we concluded that it would be extremely difficult to pursue the 2022 bid under the current circumstances, but that a future bid would make sense for Ukraine and Ukrainian sport.”

The Ukrainian Prime Minister agreed that “a bid for 2026 would have excellent potential for the economic recovery of the country, and could have huge benefits for Ukrainian society”.

For the NOC, President Sergey Bubka added: “We would like to thank the IOC very much for its help and understanding, as well as the great assistance that it has given to Ukrainian athletes from all parts of the country, both morally and financially.”

 

Source: IOC – www.olympic.org